Gawton Mine, Devon

Gawton Mine, Devon

Gawton Mine, Tavistock Hamlets, mined tin, copper and arsenic. Last active
in 1926 when copper was precipitated from the run off from the dumps. Ref: Richardson
P.H.G. (1991) Mines of Dartmoor & the Taymar Valley after 1913, Devon Books,
Tiverton. Its main working was from 1845 to 1887

Today there remains a crooked chimney on the hilltop at the top of the arsenic
flue and rock dumps beside the river. Most of the remaining buildings are on
the hillside just above the red sand dumps, which are said to contain 124 000
tons of material. The remains of a small arsenic labyrinth is located directly
below these dumps. Down towards the river are more overgrown dumps, a set of
lime kilns and other buildings. This part of the sett is separated from the
main rock dumps down towards the old brickworks chimney by a small steam draining
the tailings which contains many pebbles coated with bright blue/green copper
mineral precipitates

Some of the buildings are now private residences and the former Count House
(Mine captains office) has been restored and converted into a holiday
cottage.

Frank Booker in The Industrial Archaeology of the Tamar Valley says that Gawton
Quay began as a wharf to serve Gawton copper mine. In 1860 Gawton and New Quay
quays formed almost a continuous frontage along the river for nearly a quarter
of a mile.